Diadoumenos by Polyclete - life-size statue

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The Diadoumenos is a statue in the round dated from the 5th century BC, in the middle of the classical period (490-338 BC), originally in bronze, the only ones that have survived are those in marble. This statue is that of a naked young athlete, standing, leaning on his right leg, left leg slightly carried backwards; with his arms raised, the athlete originally attached a victory band around his forehead.

Its name comes from the headband, because diadoumenos means "he who is girded with the headband". The particularity of this statue is the dynamism that emerges from it, particularly thanks to the movement given by the back and shoulders.

Polyclete and the Canon

The Diadoumenos was made by Polyclete, between 460 to 420 BC, he was the first sculptor to write a treatise on his work, the Canon (or ruler in Greek), defines numerical relationships between body parts. The literary references refer to a Diadoumenos made by the artist. Even more convincing is the undeniable kinship that unites the type with that of the Doryphoros, Polyclete's most famous work.

The Canon is part of the intellectual currents of the middle of the 5th century BC. Polyclete applies these theories by creating effigies of athletes whose entire anatomy is governed by skilful calculations. He established a model of equilibrium that would become widely accepted as the contrapposto. The harmony of the whole is thus achieved by the readability of the "muscular armour", organised into clear and well defined masses.

Dimensions

Height: 77.16 ". 
Width: 22.44 ".
Depth: 19.68 ".
Weight: 264.55 Lbs.
Material: reconstituted marble (marble dust + high density resin).

In stock

Delivery time: Delivery within 15 days to 25 days.

Shipping: Transport costs are automatically calculated when you finalize your purchases at the checkout.

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Another interpretation of the Canon

But The Diadoumenos proposes a flexible solution to the principles set out in the Doryphoros; in this, it is a variation of the Canon.
Indeed, the movement caused by the lifting of the arms creates a vertical momentum and modifies the muscular responses of the torso. The anatomy is slimmer, while the attitude is softened by an accentuated inclination of the shoulders. The general impression is that of a greater lightness in the proportions, which may have led some to say that there was contamination of the attic art, but which in any case justifies a later dating than that of the Doryphoros.

As natural as his attitude may seem, it is therefore not to be seen in the Diadoumenos as the representation of any athlete enjoying his victory. Its realization is the result of rigorous intellectual research that finds its plastic expression in this ideal and thought-out anatomy. This body, recomposed by mathematical calculations, makes the Diadumenus the idea, not the portrait, of an athlete, and places him definitively outside our world.

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Diadoumenos by Polyclete - life-size statue

The Diadoumenos is a statue in the round dated from the 5th century BC, in the middle of the classical period (490-338 BC), originally in bronze, the only ones that have survived are those in marble. This statue is that of a naked young athlete, standing, leaning on his right leg, left leg slightly carried backwards; with his arms raised, the athlete originally attached a victory band around his forehead.

Its name comes from the headband, because diadoumenos means "he who is girded with the headband". The particularity of this statue is the dynamism that emerges from it, particularly thanks to the movement given by the back and shoulders.

Polyclete and the Canon

The Diadoumenos was made by Polyclete, between 460 to 420 BC, he was the first sculptor to write a treatise on his work, the Canon (or ruler in Greek), defines numerical relationships between body parts. The literary references refer to a Diadoumenos made by the artist. Even more convincing is the undeniable kinship that unites the type with that of the Doryphoros, Polyclete's most famous work.

The Canon is part of the intellectual currents of the middle of the 5th century BC. Polyclete applies these theories by creating effigies of athletes whose entire anatomy is governed by skilful calculations. He established a model of equilibrium that would become widely accepted as the contrapposto. The harmony of the whole is thus achieved by the readability of the "muscular armour", organised into clear and well defined masses.

Dimensions

Height: 77.16 ". 
Width: 22.44 ".
Depth: 19.68 ".
Weight: 264.55 Lbs.
Material: reconstituted marble (marble dust + high density resin).

In stock

Delivery time: Delivery within 15 days to 25 days.

Shipping: Transport costs are automatically calculated when you finalize your purchases at the checkout.

Write a review

 
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