Tréglonou Necklace

BZ400008

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During the Iron Age, the west of Armorica was distinguished from Celtic Europe by two essential features: the creation of granite stelae and the digging of underground passages near inhabited places. This practice lasted about four centuries (from the 5th to the 2nd century exclusively).

The one in Tréglonou is associated with a real oppidum of about twenty hectares is composed of a vertical well giving access to a row of two small rooms with low ceilings, connected by a cat flap. The underground structure ends in a narrow inclined gut opening into the outer ditch of the entrenchment.

It is in this tunnel that the pearls of a gold necklace were discovered.

These pearls each consist of two deep-drawn gold shells, decorated with both engraved and embossed motifs. The length of the pearls varies from 1,6 to 2,5cm and their weight from 2 to 4,4g, the total weight being of 37g the mould of assembly of the hulls, studied by C. Eluère, A.R. Duval raises of a great smoothness: it is about the process of welding by diffusion of copper.

These pearls are unique and without equivalent in Europe. Some comparisons can be made with pinheads from the Swiss Final Bronze Age, with Hallstattian jewels from Alsace, Southern Germany and Switzerland and with some pearls from the Irish and British Final Bronze Age.

The pearls of Tréglonou could have a local origin and have been manufactured between the 9th and 5th century BC. They were hidden... or lost at the time of the condemnation of the site by people of the Iron Age around 300-400 BC.

Dimensions
Length: 44 cm.
Weight: 150 g.
Period: 9th - 5th centuries BC
Museum: Quimper - Breton departmental museum - France.
Material: Golden pewter.
Editor: rmngp.

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Tréglonou Necklace

During the Iron Age, the west of Armorica was distinguished from Celtic Europe by two essential features: the creation of granite stelae and the digging of underground passages near inhabited places. This practice lasted about four centuries (from the 5th to the 2nd century exclusively).

The one in Tréglonou is associated with a real oppidum of about twenty hectares is composed of a vertical well giving access to a row of two small rooms with low ceilings, connected by a cat flap. The underground structure ends in a narrow inclined gut opening into the outer ditch of the entrenchment.

It is in this tunnel that the pearls of a gold necklace were discovered.

These pearls each consist of two deep-drawn gold shells, decorated with both engraved and embossed motifs. The length of the pearls varies from 1,6 to 2,5cm and their weight from 2 to 4,4g, the total weight being of 37g the mould of assembly of the hulls, studied by C. Eluère, A.R. Duval raises of a great smoothness: it is about the process of welding by diffusion of copper.

These pearls are unique and without equivalent in Europe. Some comparisons can be made with pinheads from the Swiss Final Bronze Age, with Hallstattian jewels from Alsace, Southern Germany and Switzerland and with some pearls from the Irish and British Final Bronze Age.

The pearls of Tréglonou could have a local origin and have been manufactured between the 9th and 5th century BC. They were hidden... or lost at the time of the condemnation of the site by people of the Iron Age around 300-400 BC.

Dimensions
Length: 44 cm.
Weight: 150 g.
Period: 9th - 5th centuries BC
Museum: Quimper - Breton departmental museum - France.
Material: Golden pewter.
Editor: rmngp.

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