Goddess Maat

New product

Judging by the figurative scenes, it is a graceful little person, seated, wearing an ostrich feather on her head, who writes her name; it is also the right weight that will serve, in the balance of judgment of the dead, to weigh the heart of the deceased and to recognize whether he is Maaty, that is to say, in conformity with Maat: the texts tell her that she is the daughter of Ra and it is her that kings offer to the gods, carried in the palm of their hand like a little doll, on most of the scenes in the back of the chapels.

Maat is the offering par excellence, the one that practically takes the place of others because it virtually includes them in it. For these various reasons, it is customary to consider Ma' at as the incarnation of Truth and Justice. This opinion is far from reckless and is justified by a multitude of proofs: when judged, the heart of the deceased is compared to the Truth; the vizier, the supreme chief of the Egyptian courts, is "priest of Maat;" speaking according to Maat "is opposed to" lying "...

But if the term Maat is appropriate to its various forms of truth or its application in justice, it also means something else, infinitely broader, and it seems that the terms of truth and justice correspond to only two of its aspects. When the demiurge created the Universe, he gave shape to a world fixed definitively in its aspect and its relations; the creative act had of course to be repeated, the voracity of the forces of chaos continuing to threaten the very existence of the created world, but within this world everything was perfect, in accordance with the definitive plan of the god: no perfection remained to wait for successive stages.

Reproduction in patinated resin

Dimensions with base:
Height: 14 cm
Width: 6 cm
Depth: 4 cm
Weight: 0.3 kg
Origin: Egypt
Period: Lower Era, Persian domination (525-333 BC)
Museum: Paris - Louvre Museum
Materials available: Resin or Bronze
Editor:rmngp

More details

80 €

  • Bronze
  • Resin

- +

 
More info

Now the balance of all this universe, the harmonious relationship of its elements, their necessary cohesion, essential to the maintenance of the forms created, is what the Egyptians call Maat: It is the interaction of the forces that ensure the universal order, from its essential constituent elements (such as celestial movements, regular phenomena, the continuation of days, the rising of a new sun each morning) to the most humble of its manifestations, those of human society, the concord of the living, religious piety, respect on earth for the order conceived by the gods, hence justice in its social relations and truth in the world.

Maat, it is therefore both universal order and ethics that consists of acting, in all circumstances, in accordance with the consciousness that one has of this universal order.

Write a review

Goddess Maat

Judging by the figurative scenes, it is a graceful little person, seated, wearing an ostrich feather on her head, who writes her name; it is also the right weight that will serve, in the balance of judgment of the dead, to weigh the heart of the deceased and to recognize whether he is Maaty, that is to say, in conformity with Maat: the texts tell her that she is the daughter of Ra and it is her that kings offer to the gods, carried in the palm of their hand like a little doll, on most of the scenes in the back of the chapels.

Maat is the offering par excellence, the one that practically takes the place of others because it virtually includes them in it. For these various reasons, it is customary to consider Ma' at as the incarnation of Truth and Justice. This opinion is far from reckless and is justified by a multitude of proofs: when judged, the heart of the deceased is compared to the Truth; the vizier, the supreme chief of the Egyptian courts, is "priest of Maat;" speaking according to Maat "is opposed to" lying "...

But if the term Maat is appropriate to its various forms of truth or its application in justice, it also means something else, infinitely broader, and it seems that the terms of truth and justice correspond to only two of its aspects. When the demiurge created the Universe, he gave shape to a world fixed definitively in its aspect and its relations; the creative act had of course to be repeated, the voracity of the forces of chaos continuing to threaten the very existence of the created world, but within this world everything was perfect, in accordance with the definitive plan of the god: no perfection remained to wait for successive stages.

Reproduction in patinated resin

Dimensions with base:
Height: 14 cm
Width: 6 cm
Depth: 4 cm
Weight: 0.3 kg
Origin: Egypt
Period: Lower Era, Persian domination (525-333 BC)
Museum: Paris - Louvre Museum
Materials available: Resin or Bronze
Editor:rmngp

Write a review

 
Comments(0)

No customer reviews for the moment.

30 other products in the same category:

Recently Viewed

Menu